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Climate Change and

Public Perception in Brazil

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WHAT IS MORE IMPORTANT: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION OR ECONOMIC GROWTH?

DO THE AMAZON FIRES TARNISH BRAZIL’S IMAGE ABROAD?

HAVE YOU HEARD OF THE

AMAZON FIRES?

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THE CHALLENGE

To analyze the knowledge and concern of Brazilians’ on climate change and the yearly forest fires in the country, along with the goal of collecting data for organizations that focus their work and research on the climate.
 

To achieve this, the Institute for Technology and Society - ITS and the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication coordinated a nationwide study on the climate change and public perception in Brazil.

METHODOLOGY

The research was conducted by IBOPE Inteligência (IBOPE Intelligence) with 2,600 interviewees of 18 years and over in the 5 regions of Brazil, between the 24th of September and the 16th of October in 2020. The interviews were by phone with an electronic questionnaire, using a C.A.T.I. system (Computer Assisted Telephone Interview).

 

The electronic questionnaire for collecting the data was translated and adapted from a nationwide climate perception study in the USA conducted by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. Questions regarding Brazil were also included in the questionnaire, such as questions on the Amazon fires.

Weighting factors for the study were calculated by IBOPE Intelligence to correct the demographic quotas, based upon data by the National Household Sample Survey (Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio, PNAD) and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística - IBGE).

 

The study sample is representative of the Brazilian population with 18 years of age and over and allows independent readings of the results per geographical region in Brazil. The margin of error for the study is 2 percentage points for the results of the whole sample, considering a confidence level of 95%.

To access the open data, please send an email to itsrio@itsrio.org.